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Poor aerobic capacity = accumulation of risk factors for type 2 diabetes


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A recent study shows that the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease accumulate in children with poor aerobic capacity.

The University of Eastern Finland has found that children who have poor aerobic fitness are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and be exposed to risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Research has also found that the typical way d Expressing aerobic capacity as a proportion of total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic capacity in identifying children at increased risk for these diseases.

Determination of poor aerobic capacity

The study determined threshold values ​​for aerobic fitness for girls and boys, helping to identify children who are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The aerobic capacity of the participants was determined by measuring the maximum oxygen uptake during a stress test. In addition, their body fat and skeletal muscle mass were measured by bioelectrical impedance.

Often, poor aerobic capacity is determined by dividing the measurement of aerobic capacity obtained from a stress test by the total body mass which includes adipose tissue. In this way, the calculated measure describes not only aerobic capacity, but also adiposity or body fatness, which can lead to misinterpretations of the association of aerobic capacity with risk factors for type diabetes. 2 and cardiovascular disease.

Total body mass over skeletal muscle mass

Recently published study shows that children with poor aerobic fitness relative to their total body mass have a remarkably higher risk of developing risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease than their peers with better aerobic fitness . When aerobic capacity was proportional to skeletal muscle mass, the association of aerobic capacity with risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease remained, but was considerably lower than when it was proportioned to total body mass.

Dr Agbaje, lead author of the study, University of Eastern Finland, further explains: “Measures of aerobic capacity based on total body mass are better able to predict the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. as measurements based on skeletal muscle mass; however, they exaggerate the role of aerobic capacity in children’s health.

Agbaje concludes: “We need to be careful when interpreting measures of aerobic fitness that are proportionate to total body mass in order to correctly identify children who really need intervention in health and fashion. of life. “




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